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Safeguarding

2020/21 TKAT Safeguarding Policy

Keeping Children Safe in Education (KCSIE): Statutory guidance for schools and colleges - September 2020

SAFEGUARDING – KEEPING YOUR CHILDREN SAFE IN SCHOOL

Our primary concern is to ensure all children at Drapers Mills feel HAPPY and SAFE with us.  If we can do this, then all of our children will be successful in their learning journey.

 

Designated Safeguarding Leads: Joe Manclark / Ann Evans 

Deputy Safeguarding Leads: Tracey Watler, Sonia Leen, Miska Gordan, Sarah Roberts, Jill Hitch  

Nominated Drapers Mills Governor responsible for Safeguarding /Child Protection: Roger Silk

TKAT - Senior Safeguarding Lead - Scott Wilson/Sara Walton 

What is Safeguarding?

 

Safeguarding is the action that is taken to promote the welfare of children and protect them from harm.

 

Safeguarding means:

 

  • Protecting children from maltreatment
  • Preventing impairment of children’s health or development
  • Ensuring that children grow up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care
  • Taking action to ensure that all children have the best outcomes

Safeguarding children and child protection guidance and legislation applies to all children up to the age of 18.

 

What is Safeguarding?

 

Child Protection is part of Safeguarding and promoting welfare. It refers to the activity that is undertaken to protect specific children who are suffering, or are likely to suffer, significant harm.  

 

Safeguarding is everyone's responsibility

 

Everyone who works with children has a responsibility for keeping them safe. No single practitioner can have a full picture of a child’s needs and circumstances and, if children and families are to receive the right help at the right time, everyone who comes into contact with them has a role to play in identifying concerns, sharing information and taking prompt action.

 

Mandatory Reporting of FGM - Procedural information 

From 31 October 2015 it is mandatory for teachers, health and social workers to report to the police if they find, or are told, someone under 18 has undergone FGM. Please click here to obtain more information on the correct procedure to follow.

Keeping Children Safe in Education - September 2020

 

Please click here to access the statutory guidance from the Department for Education. The guidance above affirms (page 6) that 'all staff members should be aware of systems within their school or college which support safeguarding and these should be explained to them as part of staff induction. This should include:

 

It is imperative that all staff (including volunteers) read this guidance (Have to read at least Part 1) and provide consent that they have done so (a register exists to determine this) Schools must have regard to the guidance when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. This document contains information on what schools should do and sets out the legal duties with which schools must comply. 

 

The Prevent Duty 

 

As part of Drapers Mills ongoing safeguarding and child protection duties we are fully behind the government's Prevent Strategy.

From 1 July 2015 all schools are subject to a duty under section 26 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015, in the exercise of their functions, to have “due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism”. This duty is known as the Prevent Duty for Schools.

Drapers is committed to safeguarding, and promoting the welfare of all our children and families. We build pupils’ resilience to radicalisation by promoting fundamental British Values and enabling our pupils to challenge extremist views.  Click here to access Educate Against Hate website.

All our staff and governors have completed safeguarding and e-learning training developed by the National Counter Policing Headquarters (NCTPHQ), in conjunction with the College of Policing which includes guidance on how to identify people who may be vulnerable to being drawn into Terrorism, and how to refer them into the Channel process. Channel is a key process within the Prevent strategy for assessing individuals’ vulnerability to being drawn into terrorism. It focuses on early intervention and diverting people away from risk.

Please click here to access departmental advice for schools on the Prevent Duty (DFE). Alternatively you can also refer to (Keeping Children Safe in Education) above for further information as well as our Safeguarding/Child Protection Policy and British Values statement.

Referrals to Children's Social Care (Front Door Service)

 

Central Duty Team - 03000 41 61 61

Out of Hours -  03000 41 91 91

social.services@kent.gov.uk

Visit the Kent Safeguarding Children Board website if you're worried about a child (click text).

 

 

Further Resources

Safeguarding in Education - HLT Resource page 

Safeguarding children and young people (GOV.UK) 

Safeguarding Children (NSPCC) 

Online safety (NSPCC) 

Safeguarding in the Curriculum

 

Safeguarding and the promotion of British Values is central to our work at Drapers Mills Primary Academy. We plan to constantly challenge children to think deeply about safeguarding matters and their own personal physical and mental wellbeing.  

We identify opportunities in the curriculum for children to learn about safeguarding is core to our school.

Our unique curriculum and values give pupils opportunities to experience life in all its diversity, to acquire resilience, knowledge, understanding and skills that significantly impact on personal development, behaviour, welfare and safety and equips every child with the knowledge and skills required for personal safeguarding.

Our outdoor learning, particularly in EYFS offers a unique opportunity to learn about safety in our locality including understanding risks.

Our PSHE curriculum covers all areas of Safeguarding including SRE, Drugs And Alcohol Education, anti-bullying, relationships, citizenship and health education.  We are sensitive in our teaching and recognise that some more sensitive subjects need to taught at an age appropriate level, or at a small group or 1:1 level where a more urgent need arises.

Safeguarding opportunities are planned into the curriculum, for example: 


  • Road and beach safety (including out of school visits, bikeability, work with police officers in the community)
  • Poolside and water safety through swimming lessons
  • Rail Safety
  • Fire awareness (including visits to and from the local fire service)
  • Visits to school from medical staff
  • Visitors from charities such as NSPCC
  • Work from local voluntary sector services particularly around safe transition to Secondary school
  • Online safety and the use of social media

Online Safety

 

Online safety and coronavirus

Children and young people’s lives have changed dramatically because of the coronavirus. With social distancing measures and most schools closing, children will be spending more time at home and online.

And while the internet is a great way for children and young people to stay in touch with their friends and keep busy during lockdown, it can also bring risks. Now more than ever it’s important to talk to your child about staying safe online and about the apps and sites they’re using. We’ve got advice to help. 

 

Screen time

While many parents and carers may be worried about their children spending more time online during lockdown, it’s important to understand what they’re doing online rather than setting limits on their total screen time.

For example, a child may spend hours searching the internet, while another child may spend less time each day talking to people they don’t know on a livestreaming or video app.

Asking them about the sites, apps and games they use regularly can be a great way to start a conversation and help you identify any risks in what your child’s doing online or who they may be talking to. We’ve got some great tips below to help get you started.

You can also find online safety tips and information about social networks, apps and games for parents over on Net Aware.

 

Livestreaming and video apps

Many children will find it hard not being able to see their friends or family in person, and video apps can be a great way for them to stay in touch during lockdown when used safely, but there are also risks for young people.

It’s really important to help your child understand how to livestream and use video apps safely and make sure they’re speaking to people they know already. Net Aware has advice on livestreaming, including how to keep children safe on popular online apps such as ZoomHouseParty and WhatsApp.

Young people may also be curious or explore risky behaviours online. Take a look at our advice for parents on sexting and sending nudes to help support your child.

 

Social media safety

Children are also likely to be spending more time on social media during coronavirus lockdown. While social media can be a good way for children and teenagers to stay in touch with friends they’re unable to see in person, it can also be unsafe. Children using social media may also be at greater risk of online abuse or online bullying during coronavirus lockdown.

recent NSPCC survey shows that children turning to social media because they’re feeling lonely or have poor mental health are at higher risk of being groomed online.

Talking to your child about what they’re doing or sharing online can help you to understand any risks and keep them safe. Net Aware also has advice on popular social media sites and apps, including TikTokSnapchat and Facebook

 

 

 

Starting a conversation about online safety


It can be difficult to know how to start talking to your child about what they’re doing online or who they might be speaking to. But talking regularly, like you would about their day at school, will help your child feel relaxed and mean that when they do have any worries, they’re more likely to come and speak to you. It can help to: 
 

    • reassure them that you're interested in their life, offline and online. Recognise that they'll be using the internet to research homework as well talking to their friends.
    • ask your child to show you what they enjoy doing online or apps they’re using so you can understand them.
    • be positive but also open about anything you're worried about. You could say "I think this site's really good" or "I'm a little worried about things I've seen here."
    • ask them if they're worried about anything, and let them know they can come to you.
    • ask them about their friends online and how they know they are who they say they are.
    • listen for the reasons why your child wants to use apps or site you don't think are suitable, so you can talk about these together.
    • ask your child what they think's okay for children of different ages so they feel involved in the decision making.

What do parental controls do?

 

These controls are designed to help parents and carers manage their child's online activities. There are various types, some of which are free but others which can be bought. However, nothing is totally fool proof so they shouldn't replace the need for you to support and advise your child using the internet.

For detailed guidance on the different types of control, you can use this online tool from Internet Matters. This gives you the chance to set up a personalised list of the controls used in your home on all your different devices. There is also advice on how to use all the various controls, with videos and step-by-step instructions.

 

What can controls be used for?

 

Controls can either be for a device like a games console, or for a network such as your home broadband.

The way to access device controls can vary according to the manufacturer. They can offer varying types of protection, from filtering out adult content from search results to preventing your child from buying things when playing games. You can usually find instructions on how to set these controls up on the manufacturer's website or use the Internet Matters app for help.

These settings will apply whether the device is being used in your home outside – but it's easy for them to be switched off, so talk to your child about trust and responsibility, making sure they understand the importance of why you have put the settings in place.

Most games consoles come with settings, which can be put in place for either the device itself or the games platform. It's easy to forget that games consoles allow players to connect to the internet and talk to people all over the world so setting controls on devices and the platform itself (such as XBox) is important.

Broadband and network filters generally come free with your service. These can be used to prevent material coming into your home. For example, you could restrict anything with a horror or sexual content being accessible via your home broadband. Instructions for accessing these filters can be found on the service provider's websites – look at the bottom of the page to find the "help" or "security" page.

 

Online controls

 

Search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing allow users to filter out certain types of search results. This means you can reduce the risk of your child seeing adult content like pornography, or set limits on the time they spend online. Look for the cogwheel “settings” symbol where you will find the options for each provider. You can also encourage your child to use safer search facilities, such as SafeSearch Kids from Google.

 

Social media and other websites

 

As with search engines, social media and sites like YouTube have privacy and security settings. These can prevent your child from being contacted by strangers or from seeing inappropriate material. It is important to remember that content filters can't prevent other people from sending offensive or inappropriate messages or comments to your child's account, so controlling who can contact your child is a key step.

What Parents Need to Know about Online Grooming

Pupil Version -Child Protection Policy

SUMMER SAFETY - A FEW LINKS

SWIM SAFELY THIS SUMMER

E-Safety

 

Click here for our E-Safety page

Hot Weather

 

Summer seems to be well and truly here. It provides great opportunities to be outside and have fun but we want children to stay safe in hot and sunny conditions. Below are a couple of short clips which children might enjoy, helping  them to understand the importance of taking some simple safety measures during the summer heat.

 

This one is the Despicable Me 2 Sun Safety campaign.  

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7UWvqNeqX6E

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwyqaLnsi5Q

This clip is a rhyme/animated story called 'George The Sun Safe Superstar.'

 

 

 

 

Digital Parenting Magazine -Vodafone

 

Vodafone produce an excellent magazine for parents and carers regarding online safety. It can be read online or read as a PDF by following the link below.

http://vodafonedigitalparenting.co.uk/

Child Sexual Exploitation -A Guide for Parents and Carers

Instagram Terms and Conditions

The Children’s Commissioner has recently published a reort called ‘Growing Up Digital‘. One of the things that is of particular interest in the report is the fact that around half of 8 – 15 year olds use Instagram. However, the ‘Growing Up Digital’ report authors asked legal firm, Schillings, to look over the 17 pages of Instagram’s Terms and Conditions, written at a level that could only be understood by a graduate! Schillings own lawyers simplified the TaC to help children (and the rest of us probably) understand what they mean.

Below are the Terms and Conditions made a little bit more straight forward.

TALK PANTS ( 02.08.16)

Being a parent always seems to mean lots of worrying, especially when it comes to keeping your child or children safe. All parents worry about different types of abuse and how to talk to their children about some of these issues. The NSPCC have a really useful website called 'Talk Pants.'  This site teaches children important messages, like their body belongs to them and they should tell an adult if they're upset or worried. There are activities for children on there and also advice for parents. Below you will see a link to the website and also a leafglet for parents providng some useful advice.

 

Get the PANTS guide that's right for you

We have a range of PANTS guides for parents and carers including guides in Welsh, guides for people with a disability and for children with autism.

 

Guide for parents 

https://www.nspcc.org.uk/globalassets/documents/advice-and-info/pants/pants-2018/pants-parents-guide-online.pdf

 

Guidance for foster Carers 

https://www.nspcc.org.uk/globalassets/documents/advice-and-info/underwear-rule-guidance-foster-carers.pdf

 

Guide for parents with a learning disability  

https://www.nspcc.org.uk/globalassets/documents/advice-and-info/underwear-rule-parents-learning-disabilities-english.pdf

 

https://www.nspcc.org.uk/keeping-children-safe/support-for-parents/underwear-rule/

 

 

 

 

Pokémon Go

Information for Parents to help children play safely.

https://www.nspcc.org.uk/preventing-abuse/keeping-children-safe/online-safety/pokemon-go-parents-guide/

 

April 2016

 

BE NET AWARE

 

As parents, we often worry about what our children are accessing on tablets and computers. Sometimes it can be difficult to tell how suitable something is. I  have come across a website that parents and carers might find very useful. It does give you some information about different apps, what other parents and children think and rates some of the risks. You can access it by following the link below.

www.net-aware.org.uk

 

15th March 2016

Safeguarding is everyone's responsibility. The DFE are currently launching a new campaign 'Together We Can Tackle Child Abuse.'  https://www.gov.uk/report-child-abuse

If you are ever concerned about a child, the link will provide you with the necessary advice on how to report your concerns.

 

Dear Parents and  Carers, I know some of you have concerns around recent events in the news regarding radicalisation and extremism.

 

As a school, we have  duty to be very aware of how radicalisation and extremism can impact on our children and families. Therefore, with this in mind, I would like to make you aware of some of the measures the school takes to keep children safe.

 

Those with extremist views will often try and express their views through social networking and the internet, such as YouTube clips etc. We have a firewall in school which is recommended by Kent  Education Authority which helps prevent social networking sites being accessed in school and limits websites  and images.

 

We have an Extremism and Radicalisation Policy which helps set out how staff should deal with concerns and there are a number of signs  identified with radicalisation which staff can be aware of and alert to.

 

Our school strongly promote British Values, one of which is Tolerance. We bring this into assemblies, Circle times, when dealing with inappropriate behaviour and any other opportunities within our curriculum to ensure children understand tolerance and respect for others. RESPECT is also one of our School Values.

 

Staff have had some training relating to Radicalisation and Extremism and are aware of what to look out for.

The school has lockdown procedures for any such relevant emergencies.

 

How can you help?

Be aware of what your child is accessing on the internet and with gaming as extremists can often try and get their message across through this media. Check games, websites and social networking sites are age appropriate and give children the confidence to share their worries if they see something inappropriate.

 

Model Tolerance in your own lives wherever possible. Children are significantly influenced by their families so if you are modelling respect and tolerance, this will help them to understand these concepts and build on what we teach them in school.

 

Inform our Child Protection lead, Mr Scott Wilson if you have any worries or concerns. We are always happy to talk. If you are unsure about parental Settings on computers and tablets, or firewalls for devices, then please feel free to ask the school for advice.

I hope this helps.

 

 

BE SAFE, BE SEEN!

 

Now that the clocks have gone back, it is starting to get dark earlier and earlier. It is really important that children can be clearly seen by motorists and cyclists to keep them as safe as possible when they are walking to and from school, or out playing. There are lots of small reflectors, reflective strip stickers or snap bands for wrists and ankles which can all help children to be seen clearly.

Below are a couple of websites where you can find more information about 'Be Safe, Be Seen'. We would recommend that you explore the website yourself first before sharing it with your child so you can pick out bits which you feel are the most appropriate.

 

 

 

www.roadsafety.cardiff.gov.uk/to-school-safely/be-safe-%E2%80%93-be-seen/

http://talesoftheroad.direct.gov.uk/be-bright.php

 

 

 

FIREWORK SAFETY

Once again, Bonfire Night is nearly upon us. It is such a wonderful time to have fun but we want all our families to keep safe at this time. Therefore, it is very important to follow firework safety guidelines as this will help you to make careful choices, be safe and still have great fun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Be Safe on Bonfire Night

Never play with fireworks - They are explosives and can hurt you.

Always keep fireworks in a closed box and always follow the instructions on the box.

Only adults should light or hold fireworks.

When you are watching fireworks stand well back.

Never go near a firework that has been lit. Even if it hasn’t gone off, it could still explode.

Fireworks will frighten your pets, so keep your pets safely indoors.

If you are given a sparkler:

Always wear gloves. Hold it at arm’s length. When your sparkler goes out, DON’T TOUCH IT. It could still burn you, so put it in a bucket of water.

 

Never let off fireworks in public places such as streets or parks. 

 

For further advice about firework and bonfire safety, there are many websites. The website link below does provide some additional safety information.

http://www.saferfireworks.com/family/index.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For your information

New legislation has come out on October 1st 2015 regarding smoking in enclosed vehicles. The legislation states (www.gov.uk)

'

It is illegal to smoke in a car (or other vehicle) with anyone under 18. The law changed on 1 October 2015, to protect children and young people from the dangers of second hand smoke.

Both the driver and the smoker could be fined £50. The law applies to every driver in England and Wales, including those aged 17 and those with a provisional driving licence.

The law applies:

  • to any private vehicle that is enclosed wholly or partly by a roof
  • when people have the windows or sunroof open, or the air conditioning on
  • when someone sits smoking in the open doorway of a vehicle

Keeping Children Safe at Drapers Mills Poster

Drapers Mills Safeguarding/Child Protection Policy September 2015 ( Draft, awaiting ratification)

A Safeguarding Leaflets for Visitors and Volunteers

Preventing Radicalisation Policy ( draft and awaiting ratification)

What's the problem? -A guide for parents of children who have got in to trouble online

New Safeguarding website for parents - Parent Info

In schools we have lots of opportunities to learn about safeguarding and, particularly the online aspect. Parents on the other hand need access to support too. It is not always easy to encourage parents to meetings about esafety, but it is crucial they understand the risks.

The government has recently launched a brand new website to support parents. The website has being developed with ParentZone and CEOP, the police command responsible for child exploitation and online protection.

Parent Info is a collection of articles, tips, expert advice and resources designed to help parents keep up with what their children are doing on-line. For example, the site currently includes information about staying safe on minecraft, mental health, and building online resilience.

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